Thursday, January 21, 2016

FOODFIC: Please Welcome Elizabeth Isaacs, Author of The Light of Asteria



Cultures normally develop because of beliefs. Some stem from religion (like the Native Americans belief that the Earth is the one true life source given to all by the Maker) while others focus on a societal structures (such as America’s central conviction of freedom).

And so when I first started creating the world of Kailmeyra, a world without evil, I thought a great deal on how a society like that could even exist. If we assume that evil stems from hatred, it only made sense that the Alfar would need a counterbalance, which would obviously be love. I chose to expand that to include all positive emotions and intent.

For years, scientists have been studying the power of positive thoughts. That’s nothing new. But few stop to think of the power of intent.

An intent is defined as “… the state of a person's mind that directs his or her actions toward a specific object.”

For example, two men volunteer to work on a Habitat for Humanity house. One signs up because he needs community service hours, the other grew up in abject poverty
and never knew what it was like to sleep in his own bed.



Both men show up at the same time and do the same tasks. But which one is going to go above and beyond? Which one is going to make sure the nails are driven in straight, the paint hasn’t dripped on the new carpet, and the baseboards are installed properly?


I’ve found that those who do a job because they view it as an obligation tend to do the minimum amount required, whereas those that have a deep-seeded passion for helping, usually give it everything they have.

And that, my friends, is the power of intent.

But what does this have to do with the Kailmeyra series and eating?

Everything.

In Kailmeyra, intent gives off energy. Alfar eat to fuel their bodies, the dwelling in which their spirit lives. Because of this, they reverently plant their foods in the richest soils, they tend to them daily and watch them grow. And they only take what they need, allowing other animals to benefit as well.


Bottom line, their intent is to use food to sustain the life they’ve been given.

So what is America’s intent when it comes to food?

Scary question, isn’t it?

It seems to me America’s intent isn't necessarily to put the best fuel in as it is to keep our stomach's from growling. And it must be convenient. And it must be fast. Oh, and it must taste yummy!

Let's face it. Most of us know little about where our food is grown, how it’s processed or even what’s in it. Our intent is to stave off hunger as we run about our daily lives. Breakfast normally consists of something from a box with milk splashed on it while lunch is served on a tray in a cafeteria. When my kiddos were young I cannot tell you how many times we ran through a drive through to pick up something to eat for dinner as we scurried from one activity to the next. Honestly, not once did I stop and question what was in that burger or where it came from. Nor did I think a thing about handing my child a soda or a sweet tea. (It should be noted that my kiddos are now in college. I’m happy to see there is more awareness about nutrition today, and so I hope I’d be a little more diligent about it now. ;))

I never thought about the intent of eating until I wrote the first book in the Kailmeyra series. While I would love to report that I’ve lost tons of weight and am now svelte and gorgeous, unfortunately, that is not the case. I can tell you that because of the series, we now eat only organic eggs, milk, fruits and veggies, we’ve stopped eating so much red meat and I haven’t had a soda in five years.

Hey, that’s something, right?

Thanks so much, Shelley, for having me on the blog!


Thanks for stopping by to share your food for thought, Elizabeth!


If you’d like to know more about the Kailmeyra series, the first book, The Light of Asteria, is available (most FREE) on the following platforms:

Amazon          itunes          Kobo          Google Play

Barnes & Noble          CreateSpace          Blio



And you can find Elizabeth here:







Elizabeth is an author, teacher, and publishing professional who began her career as a national presenter for Resource Profiles, where she developed teacher seminars designed to foster creative brain stimulation. Moving into formal education, she helped at-risk students improve their writing skills as well as created and implemented a creative writing/blogging program that centered on teaching the 21st-century learner. Works stemming from this initiative were published online and seen in over 40 countries.

Elizabeth receives invitations to speak nationwide at schools and book clubs about Young Adult (YA) content and writing. She co-founded the popular book site, Indie-Visible.com, which reaches thousands of people throughout the world. The writer support and reader interest group promotes and interacts with followers on Goodreads, Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr and various other blog sites. Elizabeth has a Master's degree from Austin Peay State University, where she was trained in classical opera. She graduated Magna Cum Laude and was a member of the Phi Beta Kappa Honor Society.


The Light of Asteria received Honorable Mention at the New York Book Festival.

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